Adult ADHD – ADD – How to Cope!

Adult ADHD. When I told my friend, Andrew, that I had adult ADHD, he was quite surprised. He thought that I would be hyperactive, loud, with unlimited energy and no control over my impulses. Without sounding too patronizing, I told him that what he had in mind was child, which I wasn’t.

I then realized that many people did not know anything about adult ADHD because it is often mistaken for a disorder that only kids get. Although true to a certain extent, but most kids do not grow out of the disorder and it then tends to manifest itself no too far in the future. With years of dealing with this problem, I have realized that my symptoms have only gotten worse as I grew into adulthood. I suppose this is basically because of all the pressures of adult life. I was diagnosed with ADHD as a child.

Just like me, there are thousands of adults with this problem. Each day for us is a struggle where we have to control ourselves, keep our attention on the tasks at hand and keep a strict watch on our emotions. I have had troubled staying focused, being organized, managing my time and money, and remembering to do all the daily tasks. However, I have a very supportive family so it is much easier for me to deal with adult ADHD compared to all the other adults who do not have the necessary support.

I was lucky that I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was a child. The same cannot be said for so many adults who are out there. Trust me when I say that living with adult ADHD is total chaos; and living with undiagnosed adult AHDH can be a living hell. A person would be constantly stressed out about missing deadlines and forgetting appointments. In addition, the person would end up aggravating his friends and family who would think of them as an under-achiever. All this leads to self-blame.

Unfortunately, there is lack of information where adult ADHD is concerned. Most of the literature that I have found deals with children aged 2 to 12. And the saddest part is the most of these children will ultimately grow up to have adult ADHD. And most adults do not know where to go to get information on ADHD. Personally I think that adults suffering from adult ADHD do not want to be treated for this disorder because of conflicting reports that are available. In addition, there is a stigma attached when an adult seeks help and treatment. This makes adult ADHD sufferers to brush their problem under the carpet and pretend that it does not exist. I think if I had taken this route, I would not be leading such a fulfilling life.

I am not ashamed at my condition, and I try to educate and help other adults with attention deficit disorder. However, in order to combat this disorder, the adult himself has to take the first step in getting the disorder treated. For me the first step was accepting that I had a problem and then the treatment for adult ADHD became a lot easier.